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men from ft. myers to go on trial in the botched burglary and murder of the defenses back star and washington red skins pro bowler shawn taylor is not going to be spending life in prison. he was not convicted by this jury of 12 people. after about 20 hours of deliberating over four days on first-degree murder, instead they came back just moments ago with a second-degree murder conviction. clearly they had difficulty determining whether eric rivera jr. who showed not much more of a reaction during the reading of the verdict than that. he had a videotaped confession, prosecutors did of rivera saying he pulled the trigger six years ago this month when suddenly he was surprised inside the home of shawn taylor that shawn taylor comes out of the bedroom with a machete and that's when prosecutors say rivera shot him in the leg, and no gun and despite the confession, the jury only giving him second-degree murder. >>> the miami dolphins have indefinitely suspended a player over accusations of bullying. the dolphins announced that the offensive guard ritchie incognito's suspension came s
to address is corporate tax reform, in which case we could eliminate it. on defense spending, no question in my mind that additional reductions in defense spending are going to have to happen, are going to have to go forward and done in a way that focuses on strategic goals of protecting this country going forward. and yes, again, we are back to the same situation, balancing out those spending reductions, in defense, food stamps, child nutrition programs. we have to find a balance in order to stay on a path that is fiscally sound for our children and grandchildren. host: this is an editorial from "usa today," don't cut the big benefit programs. we must not balance the budget on the most vulnerable people in the country. what is his role in the conference effort? guest: he is going to make the case for the protection of the vulnerable members of our society and the benefits and the safety net society and that's a useful role that he plays. however, i would also say as i said at the outset that the basic problem here is that it's the entitlement programs, not is afety net programs, it the
services committee, has been very much involved putting those sanctions in place. alas national defense authorization act had the last tranche in that bill. i'm not one who has any sense at all and opposed to sanctions. as opposed, i am very for it. if we respond to this possibility in a negative way instead of being study and keeping sanctions in place, if we tighten the screws now when it looks as though, apparently against some opposition at home and in iran, that the iranian leadership may be willing to talk about ending, modifying, changing and making less threatening their nuclear program, and to response is negative, they could very well lose the very countries, particularly russia and china, who have stood with us to put sanctions in place internationally. it would weaken our current stations possibly, and i would say probably but at least possibly, for us to respond possibly, for us to respond rhetorically or through additional sanctions in a negative way before we have taken the couple of months that are needed to explore the reality as to whether there is a real change in ira
there and the defense minister in brussels before we afghanistan. feel that things have significantly improved and changed for the better during the last ten-year period. have been there perhaps 12 times or so. my staff who is with me today will tell me later on it was only 11 or it was really 13. have been there a lot. and the changes are pretty striking, particularly in the last few years. that is not the impression which the american people have and i will get into that in a moment. but that to me is the obvious fact that things have changed better.nged for the number of ways in afghanistan. first of all, it is more secure. is more secure because we came. it is that simple. we and our allies have made a difference. army,rowth of the afghan the strength of the afghan army on the police now, which has grown into a much more capable and respected force, including local police, which has made a major difference villages ofy in the afghanistan because they are directly connected to the elders in those villages. feared forcemost policeose 25,000 local feared by the taliban and because they are so
at communities, including military communities, is the department of defense affected by this, too? >> that's absolutely right. among the agencies that are tasked with coming up with an analysis over the course of the next nine months is front and center the department of defense and housing and urban development and the epa and such. the d.o.d. is one of the focuses of the folks who are being asked to assess how climate change may impact their mission and what they do. >> so now there's an executive order, a task force for nine months, what happens next. >> the nine-month period is really interesting because it's widely expected to overlap the period of time where the obama administration is going to be pak making a decision on the keystone pipeline out of canada which is an issue that the canadians want approved and the environmental community has rallied against. so for the obama administration, the timetable of this is going to overlap or coincide very likely with that decision. so a lot of what happens over the next nine months may be political, who is joining the task force, what are
. the russians i think raise a valid issue, whiches is the relationship between offense and defense, and that means addressing some issues between ssia and moscow on missile defense. sergey and i have had this discussion on arms before. certainly there is a relationship between strategic offense and strategic defense. i would agree that at some point there should be a treaty regulating missile defense. the fral practical reality is that's not possible here now. that's an american problem. that's an american problem with the u.s. senate. i guess @ at this point i would say, if we can't fix that, can we doing in something else snl and from the perspective for the foreseeable future the gap from strategic offense and defense is going to be so large, maybe there's another way to go. what i'm hoping is if we get more experience working together on syria and iran, there may be prospects for washington and oss cow to -- moscow to return to an agenda where they have consistent improvement from the past. taking missile defense, if you could resolve those problems, move back toward the idea t
surveillance programs. witnesses will include james clapper, james cole, and keith alexander. >> defense secretary chuck hagel held a news conference with the defense minister of new zealand. he was asked about nsa spying and iran's nuclear program. this is 15 minutes. >> afternoon. aftert afternoon -- good noon. jonathan coleman and i just finished a working lunch where we reinforced of the close ties between the united states and new zealand. having fought together in every major conflict of the last century, including afghanistan, our bonds are rooted in common interests but also in the history and values we share. our partnership is important. it is important to peace and prosperity in the asia-pacific and the united states remains committed to strengthening this partnership as one opponent of our rebalance to the region. we emphasized the significant progress we have made in expanding our defense cooperation since the washington declaration was signed last year. in addition to high-level visits like this one, we have had a productive set of exercises and training initiatives. the fi
of the nsa, keith alexander, testified before congress and their defense was clear and aggressive. >> do you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time, any type of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence services, our leaders or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> there has not been a mass casualty in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. they continue to tray. it is the great members in the intelligence community, our military, our law enforcement that have stood up and said, this is our job. >> defending themselves with passion and conviction which up to this point we hadn't seen much of in material of defense. jim shuuto watching today. what were the revelations at the hearing? >> you got the sense that they were just waiting to have the chance to push back like this. and they pushed back very strong. first on spying. both clapper and alexander saying that our allies spy on us, including on our leaders. that in fact the intelligence services in europe do so to an extent that maybe the elected leaders in europe are not aware of. and they made the a
in europe especially. germany's former defense minister will explain what is going on there. and then the former nsa director will help us understand what america's spies are really doing around the world and michael bloomberg called the mayor of the world. with the election of his successor on hand, what lessons does bloomberg have to share with us? one of them, cities need rich people. he'll explain. and the latest weapon against bad guys. it's not a new fangled drone or bunker buster bomb. it's simply brittany. i'll explain. revelations about the national security agency and spying on foreign allied leaders has been embarrassing for the obama administration at a time when it hardly needs more bad news. is it more than an embarrassment? should it raise alarms abroad and at home? at first glance this is a story that is less about ethics and more about power. the great power gap between the united states and other countries even rich european ones. the most illuminating response came from the former foreign minister of france. he said in a radio interview, let's be honest we
. new zealand minister defense and i just finished a very positive and productive working lunch where we reenforced the close ties between the united states and new zeal land. having fought together in every may gofer conflict in the last century including afghanistan, our bonds are rooted not only in the common interest as specific nations, but also in the history and values we share. our partnership is important to peace and prosperity, and the united states remains committedded to strengthening this partnership as one component of our reambulance to the region. one of the themes we emphasizedded today was the significant progress we've made in expanding our defense cooperation since the washington declaration was signed last year. in addition to high level visits like this one, we've had a productive set of exercises and training initiatives. the first joint defense policy talks in almost three decades, and the scheffel -- successful meeting with army chiefs, two nations cochaired in auckland. that meeting focused on how to work together on global peace keeping operations, a central p
and important to the defense of this country. we see the threats that come into this nation. we see what a foreign intelligence agency is expected to see. prior to 9/11 we had no way of connecting those dots. nsa would see one side and the fbi the other. so the question is how can we connect these dots in what you are seeing him do it in the least intrusive manner and thanks to you, the senate ,-com,-com ma the executive branch and the courts we have programs to do that. congressman king thank you for your comments. i know what you done in new york and the statements you have made are greatly appreciated and i would tell you that every person at nsa and the military still remembers that day and our commitment to those people that we will not forget. but that doesn't mean we are going to trample on our civil liberties and privacy. so the issue is how do we do both because of the constitution that we all swore to uphold and defend and that's what we are doing. look at the program that we have we as american citizens everyone at this table is also an american citizen, have agreed that we wo
that would impact us across a whole range of issues. >> or maybe this defense of the program would go down better in berlin. >> it is much more important for our country that we defend this nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. >> this leads to a lot of red faces in the white house. it's not clear what president obama knew about the surveillance of foreign leaders, but it is awkward and may even force a change in policy. >> we give them policy direction but what we've seen over the last two years is the capacity continues to develop and expand which is why i'm initiating a review now to make sure that was a are able to do does not necessarily mean it is what they should be doing. >> washington's defense of the surveillance program is that everyone spies on everyone and a ay -- anyway but this is question of scale. nobody does a as big as america. >> i spoke with democratic congressman brad sherman who sits on the foreign affairs committee. mr. sherman, thank you for joining me. did you hear anything in the hearings tod
defense chief says the military will monitor chinese aircraft. they flew over the southern islands of okinawa. four passed between the islands and made round trips over the pacific ocean friday and sunday. they didn't violate japanese air space. commanders with the self defense forces scrambled fighter jets as a recaution. the jets were a rare event. >> translator: it's the first time this many aircraft have flown between the islands. we're aware this is part of china expanding over the seas. >> he says they need to up their response after the chinese military flying over. >>> a japanese research team says most of the radioactive cesium that fell on the forest floor after the accident at the fukushima plant is still in the same place. researchers from the japan atomic energy agency installed in the woods in 2011 two months after the accident. they hope to learn how cesium moves from fallen leaves to soil. rain washed it off leaves six months after the accident. as leaves decomposed the cesium moved into the soil. after two years of research, 0.1 to 0.2% has reached a depth of 10 ce
this defense. >> this is not information we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our country, and in support of military operations. >> for the last several month, documents that the whistleblower edward snowden leaked showed a dragnet beyond france and spain. it's failed to become a major issue in washington. the bugging of angela merkel's phone received attention because the strategic implications of being caught. the focus worries a visiting delegation of european parliament airians investigating the scale of the u.s. program. >> spying on friends, not just on leaders, on citizens. >> tuesday's hearing was primarily about the u.s.'s domestic surveillance operations with james clapper and keith alexander key to restrict changes to variability of collecting data of u.s. citizens. >> more to come on al jazeera. coming home to start again. we are in the philippines town of zamboanga, where the standoff destroyed the homes of 10,000 families. and women out of work in iran. we look at the underrepresentation in the cou
a a newd campus an international campus women's economic . defense dollars to open up a women's economic development school, a.i.d.?'t that why is it d.o.d.? significantly to the security of the country, but i think basically the answer is because the d.o.d. did a number of things including some of the commanders' expenditures which helped the development of that is so essential to its security and this is part of it. at thee story we got american university at a town meeting we had there is one hisdent we talked about life experience. when the taliban was there, he took refuge with his family. a younger boy at that time. for safety.o iran taliban wereheas th driven out, he came back and was accepted at the american university. taught himself as a matter of fact, how to read and how to right. he is now interviewing for a job as a sales manager at seimens and applying for a scholarship. there are four fullbright scholars at the american university in kabul. wanted me to say thanks to the american people. so this is as close as i will be able to come. ine education system afghanistan, not
continue to prove why they have the best defense in the league. marcus cooper forces the fumble and watch the big fellow. on his 29th birthday he scoops and scores. they are 9-and-0 for the first time since 2003. >> every win you get in the national football league is a goodwin. is a good win. we rallied in the fourth quarter and did things better than we did early. the two touch doedownswere impo. >> roethlisberger dumps one in the end zone and a 24-24 ball game. tom brady 432 passing yard first time throwing for three or more touch downs this season. he had four today. with the patriots up and a five-yard touch down run and pats roll 55-31. >> the seattle se seahawks are f to their best start in history. wilson has never lost at home. wilson is 11-and-0 at home as a starter. third quarter action. and russe and russel son takes e keeper in for the score. >> wilson 213-yard and 2 touch downs and two int's and we are tied at 24 people. we go to overtime. and let's go home. the seahawks come from behind from 21 down. it was their biggest come from behind vicfrombehind victory ine history. >
are saying that they want proper access to their client and prepare the type of defense that they would present, and what could be said in his defense. to do that they need to seek permission from the prosecutor, permission to go to the prison that he was taken to today. and once they get that they will be able to go to that prison, which has 15,000 inmates inside, several hundreds members of the muslim brotherhood, but not the senior ones. that is what happens now for mr. morsi's point of view. >> dominick we saw morsi for the first time. was that a good thing, a bad thing as far as peace in the country is concerned, and are those demonstrators still out on the streets? >> well, the demonstrators have left the straits in the main. there is no suggestion of clashes or major clashes. >> i would say the situation is now calmer on the streets this evening this evening here in cairo, and there may be the opportunity for month protests tomorrow, and we have to take that with a pinch of assault. >> dominick, thank you very much. >> relatively quiet morning so far on wall street. investors hol
meeting withw days our commanders, our troops, president karzai. and the defense minister from brussels before he went to afghanistan. he feels that things have significantly improved and changed for the better during the last 10 years. i have been there perhaps 12 times or so. the staff later will tell me if it is really a 11 or 13. we've been there a lot. strikinges are pretty especially in the last few years. that is not the impression the american people have. that, to me, is the obvious fact that things have changed and changed for the better in afghanistan. first of all, it's more secure. we and our allies have made a the growth, the strength of the afghan army and the police now which has grown in a much more capable and respected force including the acal police, which has made major difference particularly in the villages about anna stan -- villages of afghanistan. the most feared force are those 25,000 local police feared by the taliban. because they are so directly ed to the homes and they become a major threat to the taliban control and success. they are a resilient force and
to the date before ricky alder's deadlty -- deadly attack, the department of defense testified to this committee, and this was in june of 2005, about the automated continuous evaluation system. and you all said you are going to continuously evaluate the background. mr. prioletti, in your written statement, you noted three years earlier in 2008 -- three years later, from the 2005 testimony you gave before his committee, -- this committee, president bush directed by his executive order that an individual who is -- shallfor classified be subject to continuous evaluation. that was an executive order back in 2008. i know we heard today, we're working on this. we heard we have an interagency working group. we're developing a concept of operations. i wrote this down. we're doing research. this has been going on now for a decade. a decade. if you testified in 2005, was going on in 2004, maybe more than a decade. so here we are. it's five years after the executive order, eight years after this committee heard about the plans, and we're dealing with the tragedy at the navy yard. i don't
scandal from benghazi to the obamacare, the obama defense remains the same, he just doesn't know. congressman brad win drop with us next. as a business owner, i'm constantly putting out fires. so i deserve a small business credit card with amazing rewards. with the spark cascard from capital one, i get 2% cash back on ery purchase, every day. i break my back around here. finally soone's recognizing me with unlimited rewards! meetings start at 11, cindy. [ male announcer get the ark business card from capital one. choose 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every d. what's in your wallet? i need your timesheets, larry! what's in your wallet? at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records and a low claims ratio, we do whatever it takes to make your business our siness. od. helping the world keep promises. ido more with less with buss energy.hp is help. soon, the world's most intelligent servers, designed by hp, will give ups over twice the performance, using forty percent less energy. mu
? the president's accolade shield him from scandal from benghazi to the obamacare, the obama defense remains the same, he just doesn't know. just doesn't know. congressman brad win the ocean gets warmer. the peruvian anchovy harvest suffers. it raises the price of fishmeal, cattle feed and beef. bny mellon turns insights like these into powerful investment strategies. for a university endowment. it funds a marine biologist... who studies the peruvian anchovy. invested in the world. bny mellon. help the gulf when we made recover and learn the gulf, bp from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, whe experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. at od, whatever business you're in, that's the business we're in with premium service like one of the best on-time delivery records
, domestic and foreign. we work closely with the state department, usaid, defense department, with the government of iraq, and many others in order to prevent and resolve violent conflicts. i would like to recognize some of the folks here today. of course, prime minister maliki, thank you for returning to the institute. we have the minister of foreign affairs, the minister of defense, the national security advisor, and both members of the council of representatives. the ambassador to the united states, the chief staff to the prime minister, the chief media adviser in the office of the prime minister, head of counterterrorism bureau, deputy chief of mission for the embassy of iraq, and the military general who is the attach? for the embassy of iraq. also joining us today, former secretary of state and the first woman secretary of state for the united states, madeleine albright. i am listing her as part of the usip team, which includes steve hadley, george moose, jeremy rabkin, dr. kristin lord, our executive vice president. i would like to recognize a couple of special state
i know trying to work and keep the defense department focused and dealing with 3 million americans who serve courageously in that department, i know they count on your leadership and you are doing an outstanding job under very difficult circumstances. 100 100 years. i'm honored by the purpose of the anti-defamation league to , fight for equality and equal justice. this country was founded on the principles. the veryds us of purpose of our democracy and that makes all of you great american patriots. [applause] i think i first learned about l when i was in congress and i have the opportunity to be able to learn about it. i stayed with several members of us who stayede of in washington. we stayed together. i think it's fair to say it was animal house on capitol hill. [laughter] one of the members as pointed out in the photograph was chuck schumer, someone you all know and has a tremendous passion for israel. the bottom of the house in this living room area and we made a bed. i tried to get him to say a hail mary and he made me say the shema. we tried to cover all the bases and we did.
the site's flaws and glitches as they're called. this as the white house finds itself on defense over a poor signup numbers to date. >> our goal is to get as many people done as possible. i can promise you the first enrollment numbers which are released later this month are not going to be what we want them to be. no question about that. website hasn't worked really when it's worked but we take responsibility for that, take responsibility for the errors, responsibility for fixing it. >> i think the government is inherently inhe want. government has to do certain things. there's a certain safety net. there's national defense, there's roads, a judiciary but government shouldn't take on new opportunities or new things to do when it's not managing what it has now. jenna: two different opinions there. chief white house for respondent ed henry talking to us. we encourage people to sign up for obamacare. we have very limited numbers at this point but do we have any indication about how this is affecting enrollment? >> certainly one interesting piece of new information today, jenna, you have
established with the department of defense. that offove to make the record, but i cannot. i am sure mike some of my colleagues would say what are we using the department of defense dollars to open up the women's economic element school, why isn't that a id dod? thedds significantly to security of the country. basically the answer is because the dod did a number of things. of theed the development country, which is so essential to its security. , thee story we got american university the town student talks about his life experience. the taliban was there and took refuge with his family. younger boy at that time. as third -- soon as the taliban were dripping out he came back. as a matter fact, how to read and to write. now interviewing as a job as a .ales manager there are full fulbright scholars at the university in kabul. he wanted me to say thank you to the american people. this is as close as i could come. the education system and afghanistan. so many of them, the number given to them is counterintuitive. so i do not use it. in terms of the lower grades, before you get to colleges and unive
defense. legal panel weighs in coming up. t or more on car insurance. everybody knows that. well, did you know that when a tree falls in the forest and no one's around, it does make a sound? ohhh...ohhh...oh boy! i'm falling. everybody look out! ahhhhh...ugh. little help here. geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you know. anybody? jip breaking news on top headlines and brand new stories you'll only see here. new problems for the obamacare website as the white house braces for more hearings on just what went wrong. we'll go live to the pentagon on a disturbing new report to find iran may be much closer to producing a nuclear weapon than anyone thought. and this man said he was just trying to help police nab a suspected rapist when he shot the fugitive dead. our legal panel on the slew of charges he now faces. it's all "happening now." jon: thanks for joining us for the second hour of "happening now." jenna: and happening now, a white house in damage control as the hits from fugitive leaker edward snowden continue to keep on coming. just as the white house is fending off reports t
. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> and so let me just ask you this, as you study the networks of the world, and let's just talk about the european union for a second, if i may. is it possible for chinese intelligence services military or otherwise to use networks that you would find in any nation states in the european union. >> . >> computer networks inside the european union for what they are up to. >> absolutely. >> whow about al quaida, could they use, is it possible for them to use the networks found in the european union to conduct planning operations or execution of operations? >> could. absolutely. >> and would bit in the purview of the national security agency to try to prevent those activities especially if it went through the european union and maybe even targeted at the united states or one of our allies. >> it is chairman, and it is something that we share with our allies. >> so you would collect information in those cases and share it with our allies in a way that was appropriat
of the nsa offered this defense. >> this is not information we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we, and our nato allies, have collected in defense of our country, and in support of military operations. >> but for the last several months, documents the whistle blower edward snowden leaked showed a global dragnet behind france and spain and it failed to become a major your issue in washington. the bugging of angela merkel's phone received attention because of the strategic implications of being caught. it worries a european delegation of parliament airians investigate ght the scale of the program. >> spying on friends, not just leaders, citizens. >> tuesday's hearing was about the u.s.'s domestic surveillance operations with james clapper and keith alexander key to restrict legislative changes to collect the phone call data of u.s. citizens. >> you are watching al jazeera newshour. still to come - mineral rich, but mired in chaos. the security crisis in the central african republic. and we visit a shelter for teenage mothers in kenya, who have been abandoned by th
upon its conventional forces for defense of the realm, and where it was able to work out a stalemate with the invading forces from iraq under saddam hussein. after eight years of disastrous, costly in treasure and lives, war. so the record from the outset has been against the use of weapons of mass destruction. however, there's the capability, and i know a little bit about the capability. i've studied it. for much of my adult life. it happens that when i was assigned to iran as the junior diplomat in 1959, one of my first tasks was to accompany david lilienthal, the former head of the atomic energy commission, on his trip around iran. he was in retirement. he was head of an energy company that worked with the plan organization of iran on its energy needs for the coming centuries. and he developed a plan of hydra gas fired, coal-fired, and nuclear power plants that would supply the energy needs of iran. and that original plan had a proposal of 22 reactors, nuclear reactors. to for each host. of course, that was a grand plan not feasible in the immediate circumstances. but certainly ov
exercises but minister of defense rejects allegations. >> translator: keeping a strong surveillance presence is a completely normal activity and we cannot accept what china says. we are looking to protect territory. >> reporter: and it's part of a dispute between china and japan over islands they both say they own, 18,000 japanese troops are currently in the area taking part in one of the biggest military drills ever and in okinowa and it pretends them to storm the disputed island chain and known here. >> reporter: china and japan have been here before and they are talking tougher than ever, the dispute over territory is deepening and they sent war planes into disputed air space and push boats contested boundaries at sea and they warmed troops rid yourself of the notion that it could act as a deterrent and china warned that any firing on the unmanned drone aircraft would constitute a serious provocation, an act of war of sorts and the question is how far they will backup rhetoric. >> they would like to be known they are doing the best for their country. >> reporter: previously the
, the mystic and foreign. we work closely with the state usaid, defense department, with the government of iraq, and many others in order to prevent, and resolve violent conflict. i would like to recognize some of the folks here today. of course, prime minister maladie, thank you for returning to the institute. have the minister of foreign defense the minister of advisor,ional security and both members of the council of representatives. the ambassador to the united chief staff to the prime minister, the chief media adviser in the office of the prime minister, head of counterterrorism bureau, deputy chief of mission for the embassy and the military general who is the attachÉ for the embassy of iraq. today, formers secretary of state and the first woman secretary of state for the united states, madeleine albright great i am listing her team,t of the usip which includes steve hadley, jeremy rads, kristin lord, our executive vice president. i would like to recognize a couple of special state ambassadorguest, jones, the assistant secretary of state for near east affairs, the u.s. ambassador to iraq
, to defense matters, to economic matters. i'm a strong supporter of it. >> reporter: the director of national intelligence, james clapper announced overnight he's declassifying a trove of documents about collection under the foreign intelligence surveillance act or fisa. this is the act that authorized collection of data on virtually every telephone caller here in the u.s. and later today, clapper and the head of the nsa, keith alexander, will be testifying on the hill. kate, we can expect them to face hard questions as well. >> surveillance about american citizens made some sense. i wonder if they're getting pushed too far, jim. thanks for the reporting this morning. let's head to the white house. they say they're going to declassify and review everything. brianna keilar with more this morning. is the white house abandoning the program. >> would you would wonder if you are listening to democratic senate chairman of the intelligence committee, dianne feinstein, she said, quote, collection on our allies will not continue. but one senior administration official that i've checked with said that
for the grand jury. and there were defense attorneys that decided to attack the stem by claiming judges were by a disproportionate number, appointing too many anglos as grand jury foremen because that's what judges did. judges selected the informationman for the grand jury. did not select the members. but among the members, would choose who the foreman would be. and i was subpoenaed one time back then without the defense attorneys doing their homework and they intended to put me on the stand in their attack on a raceist grand jury foreman system and used that to establish that, gee, it was grossly unfair, disproportionately number of anglos were chosen. and before i testified, they did their homework and found out hat actually, it was a disproportionate appointment, if you only looked at race, i had ppointed proportionly more african-americans as informationmen of my grand jury than the percentage of african-americans in my district. . and the reason i did that is because i didn't care who anybody's race was. it didn't matter to me. but i had to look at the backgrounds of the individuals, lo
closely with the state department, usaid, the defense department, with the government of iraq, and many others. all in order to prevent, mitigate, and resolve violent conflicts. i would like to go ahead and recognize some of the folks who are here today. of course, prime minister maliki, thank you for returning to the institute. excellency bashar zebari, minister of foreign affairs. the minister of defense. mr. off i had, national security advisor. arkin's a beery, both members of the council of representatives. so, the ambassador to the united states. also the chief media adviser in the office of the prime minister. the head of the counterterrorism the deputy chief of mission for the embassy of iraq, and the major general who is the military attachÉ for the embassy at iraq. -- todaying us to say is one of my favorite people in all of the world, former secretary of state and the first woman secretary of state to united states, madeleine albright. i am listing her as part of the u.s. ip team, which includes steve hadley, former national security adviser and a member of professor jeremy
, i think the president should stop apologizing and stop being defensive. the reality is the nsa has saved thousands of lives not just in the united states but in france, germany and throughout europe. the french is someone to talk. they carried out operations against the united states, the government and industry. as far as germany, that's where the hamburg plot began which led to 9/11. they've had dealings with iran and iraq, north korea, and the french and the germans in european countries. we're not doing it for the fun of it. this is to gather valuable intelligence which helps not just us but also helps the europeans. >> but it's deep. we were apparently bugging angela merkel's phone from the time she was an opposition leader in germany back in 2002. again, i understand why this is done. i cover these issues, but i think a lot of people watching us right now are thinking, what is it we're doing? you mentioned the hamburg plot. we share intelligence with germany. they're allies in this fight, not someone to be looked at so skeptically. >> first of all, we do share intelligence an
. an enemy with fantasies martyrdom. >> rose: he was secretary of defense under president george h.w. bush and press of staff to gerald ford. heart disease threatened his life in the course of his political career. he suffered five heart attacks the first at the age of 37. reconciled himself to dying three years ago when he was at end stage heart failure. a heart transplant in 2012 saved his life. he talks about his experiences for the first time in the new book, it is called heart, an american medical odyssey. he wrote it with the cardiologist dr. jonathan reiner who will be joining us later. i'm please to do have dick cheney back on this program. welcome. >> thank you charlie. >> rose: everybody says the same thing. you look great. you know that. >> compared to what i did, no, three years ago, i was in big big trouble. but they got me -- >> rose: you were thinking about the end. >> i was. i had hours to go, i had lived the full life and grateful for it but i fully expected i hadn't reached the end of my days. my heart was starting to shut down, liver and kidneys no longer receiving an
under both the george w. bush and obama administrations. the cia and the defense department denied the findings. in an e-mail to the newshour a pentagon spokesman wrote it is the policy of the department to protect the life and health of detainees by humane and appropriate clinical needs. and in accordance with all applicable law and policy. in addition to seeking that response from the pentagon we canned an official to appear on the program but were turned down. we are joined now by dr. stephen xenakis, retired army brigadier-general and member of the task force, now in private practice and also serves as consultant to several defense teams. and lee casey say former justice department official during the regular and and first bush administration, he practiced law and writes opinion comes for the wage waj and other publicationment welcome to both of you. stephen xenakis, broadly speak the allegations in this report seem to be that the military pushed medical personnel to do certain things and that they acquiesce-- acquiesced s it broadly against both? >> it's broadly against the mi
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